Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Open Classical- Part 1: A Game Changer in the World of Classical Music

I discovered Open Classical on my birthday last year, Sep. 10th, 2013.  I had no idea what to expect when I arrived with my violin for Classical Open Mic night at Buzzbrews in Dallas, but I was curious to see what it was all about.  I couldn't have asked for a better gift on my birthday!  It was an incredible convergence of quality classical music, a casual atmosphere, and great fun!  Open Classical has literally changed the course of my life in the last few months, and as I've brought it to my town of Frisco, TX, something very exciting is happening; an arts community has begun to form!

I recently interviewed Mark Landson, director of Open Classical Dallas, to find out in his own words what people should know about Open Classical.  Here are the highlights from our conversation. 

What is Open Classical?

Open Classical is a non-profit organization committed to bringing the community together around great classical music.  We produce and promote events that place classical music into the heart of everyday popular culture.  Classical music is the social glue used to bind people together from all ages, races, and walks of life. 

Why Classical music?

Classical music is an incredible art form that speaks directly to the soul.  It takes you on an intelligent journey of emotions and allows you to tap into something outside yourself.  Classical music helps you understand the world on another level and immediately connects you to those around you.  Listening to classical music also gives your mind and soul space to think, to imagine, and to create without limits or boundaries.  Every measure of a classical piece is not dictated by someone else and the message of the music is not spoon fed to you; instead, the beauty of classical music is in its abstract nature, the freedom for each individual to hear it, get lost in it, and make sense of it in his or her own way.  This kind of experience nourishes the soul, and because listening to classical music creates a healthy, balanced life and connected community, it should be a fundamental part of our culture.  

What is the purpose of Open Classical?

The ultimate goal of Open Classical is to open more doors for classical music in our culture.  We want to create more opportunities for classical music to be played and in doing so, grow new audiences who can enjoy, appreciate, and support classical music and musicians.  Right now, public access to quality classical music is too complicated, too elitist, too top-down.  If you want to hear a good classical musician play, you have to schedule a time when you are available for the next orchestral concert, pay a hefty admission ticket, and drive miles away to get there.  It's no wonder that classical music audiences are shrinking in size and age, and all at the expense of the most beautiful music ever written.  The problem is not with the music itself; it's with the current structure surrounding classical music.

What do you think is the cause of the diminishing classical audience?

One of the contributing factors is that in the classical music world, the decision of who gets to have a musical career comes from the top.  If you want to become a piano soloist, you have only one way to get there: win a major piano competition like the Cliburn International.  Without that, your chances of becoming a famous pianist are slim.  If you want to be a part of a world-class professional string quartet, you have to win the Fischoff National Chamber music competition.  Right now, there is no middle ground for the thousands of professional-level musicians who all have the same dream of performing and sharing their talent.  Either you make it in that top 1% or you end up feeling like a failure even after practicing for countless hours.  There are scores of disillusioned music majors who leave with a degree in their hand, beautiful works of art they have crafted, but no place to play.  What happens to them?  Some hobble through for a few years trying to make a living by performing, but most will eventually take on a completely different career (someone has to pay the bills!) and their instrument sits alone collecting dust.

The classical music structure has been the same way for 75 years, and it's not working.  Orchestras are declaring bankruptcy and music is being silenced.  Students don't seriously consider a career in music because their chances of success as defined by the system are so slim.  We have essentially choked the life out of classical music by doing the same thing over and over.  However, if you look at the pop music world, it is completely the opposite.  They are well known for innovative practices and staying current, resulting in rising stars, millions of album sales, large audiences, and plenty of radio time.  They adapt and change with every decade since tastes change, trends change, and what was valued in the 70's is no longer valued in the 80's, etc.  Change is embraced, not feared.

How does Open Classical change the game of Classical music?  

Open Classical offers the public multiple entry points into the world of classical music.  A ticket to the symphony shouldn't be the only time you hear classical music.  We believe that classical music can be played and enjoyed as regularly as pop, jazz, or rock and performed in the same venues as these other genres.  As classical music begins to take root in our culture from the bottom up, we nurture future patrons for the arts and keep this important genre alive for the next generation.

This will require innovative practices that break the chains of the elitist attitudes we often find in the classical music world.  For instance, some believe that if we are listening to Beethoven, the audience must remain reverentially quiet and come dressed ready to meet the queen, and definitely no noisy children allowed.  Unfortunately, that's not very inviting to much of the public and it's not going to gain new audiences!  However, if we take away the stuffiness surrounding classical music, we are left with the genius of the music, which by itself is powerful, wonderful, and life-changing.  We need to expose the simple beauty of classical music to the public in new ways so that they learn to love it and want more, and that's at the heart of Open Classical. 

No comments: