Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Open Classical- Part 2: Classical Open Mic Night

I interviewed Mark Landson, Director of Open Classical, about the concept of the popular Classical Open Mic Night, an innovative way of introducing the public to classical music.  Here's our conversation. . .

T:  So tell me, what exactly is Classical Open Mic?

M:  Classical Open Mic is an opportunity for anyone to come out and perform classical music in a casual, social environment.  It's a fun night where the audience and artist can interact and enjoy classical music together.  It is free and open to the public, usually hosted at a restaurant or coffee house.  We increase customers, and they provide the venue; it's a win-win!  We also supply the sound equipment, keyboard, and offer an accompanist, making it very easy for anyone to participate; just bring your instrument, your music, and play!

NOTE:  Here's the Facebook link to Classical Open Mic in Frisco, TX to view pics, videos, and sign up to play!

https://www.facebook.com/events/368349146642778/435848486559510/?notif_t=like

T:  Is it limited to only classical music?

M:  No, just mostly classical!  We want to hear music that generally doesn't get to have a voice in our current culture, but we've definitely had lots of variety: a few jazz musicians, pop vocals, originals, and even Metallica performed by a crazy Korean violinist.

T:  Ha!!  Moving on. . . so what makes Classical Open Mic an important part of Open Classical events?

M: Well as you know, the classical audience is getting smaller and smaller, and we want to change that.  Classical Open Mic builds and nurtures this audience so that the Dallas Symphony and other orchestras around the US have more patrons in the future.  Not only do we bring classical music to audiences that would never hear it to create a hunger and appreciation for it, but we also create a ladder for aspiring performing artists.  In the current classical system, there is no ladder; it's all top-down.  If you win a competition, you get to perform.  If you don't, it's almost impossible to build a fan base: you have to spend hundreds of dollars renting out a church or venue, advertise and market yourself, practice for hours and hours and hope that at least 10 people who aren't related to you show up to hear all the work you've done.  Classical Open Mic inserts a performance layer that currently doesn't exist.

T:  So Classical Open Mic is essentially an arts ladder?

M:  Yes.  It is an audience-building tool that allows artists to take more control over their own career and development.  It is modeled much like the pop music world which often times starts with playing at an open mic.  There’s a stair step, a hierarchy to build your fan base in the pop world.  Why can't that happen in the classical music world?  We have literally thousands of musicians out there who could be performing regularly but with no venue, no first step, no bottom-up approach.  We need to create opportunities for classical musicians to gain fan bases by performing regularly, networking, and connecting with an audience.  That's what Classical Open Mic does.

T:  Ok, that's great for the aspiring performer.  But let's say I'm a suburban mom who listens to Justin Timberlake while I work out and maybe some Adele with a glass of wine at night because during the day I've been accosted with Dora the Explorer songs.  Not that I'm describing my life AT ALL, but how would you convince me to come out to a Classical Open Mic night to hear boring classical music?

M:  First, I KNEW you were a Timberlake fan!  But secondly, I'd say you need to come out because it's fun!  Classical Open Mic at its core is a social activity; you get to hang out with old friends, meet new ones, and get to know the artists performing in a very casual environment.  It's always a great time and uniquely different at each one.  Yes, there is classical music, but we are taking the stigma out of it by bringing it dressed down, not dumbed down.  When you get to be up close and personal with talented musicians just a few feet away from you, hearing what they create and watching their fingers fly, I think you might change your mind about classical music!  It's good for your soul; it takes you on an intelligent journey of emotions and gives your mind space and freedom to imagine without limits; you might be surprised at how much you love it if you are open to it.

T:  So I'm hearing you say that Classical Open Mic is both beneficial for the musician but also the audience?

M:  Classical Open Mic is great for the community at large.  It's an outreach program and the strongest one we have.  It brings people together from all walks of life, races, and ages.  Music unites people and when you have a community that values the arts, you have a stronger community.

T:  What about professional musicians who have made it to the top 1%?  Is there a reason for them to come and play at a Classical Open Mic?

M:  I would ask them to attend and perform not because they need to build an audience for themselves (which probably already exists), but to inspire a future audience for classical music in general.  If we have symphony musicians and performing artists volunteer their time to play at a local Classical Open Mic, it's a bit like having a professional football player come to a student game and play on the field with them.  They are essentially celebrities offering community service to nurture the next generation of classical musicians, both performers and supporters.  As our current listening audience is slowly dying off, this is a perfect way for professionals to connect with the public, sharing their talent and ultimately resulting in people who fill seats at their orchestra concerts!

T:  Speaking of the next generation, how about kids?  Are they welcome to attend a Classical Open Mic?

M:  Definitely!  We have had lots of parents eager to expose their children to quality classical music without the inconvenience of a high-priced ticket or the stuffy environment in a concert hall!  And another benefit of bringing your kids to Classical Open Mic is that they get to interact with professional-level musicians which inspires them to continue learning on their own.  We need to change the idea that music lessons are merely for the purpose of recitals, competitions, or formal concerts; many students drop out of lessons or playing their instrument once they reach 12th grade because there is no model for what comes next.  Either you pursue the very difficult career path of music, or you will stop playing regularly as you find another career.  We want to change that!  Classical Open Mic offers a place to continue playing and listening to others, and it shows the next generation that music is a lifelong gift!

T:  I completely agree with you and you know how much I love Classical Open Mic.  It has allowed me to play in ensembles again which I haven't done for decades, and I've also returned to practicing great classical music that I've missed so much!  It's feeding a part of me that has been starving for years.  Let's circle back to something you said earlier: if Classical Open Mic is the first rung on the new performing artist's ladder, what comes next?

(To be continued. . .)

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